Emergency Medicine Conference
11th Annual
Lake Buena Vista, FL
May 3-7, 2015
Register Today

Workshop & Educational Session Descriptions

Sunday, May 3, 2015 

8:00 am - 11:00 am Workshop: Basic Emergency Ultrasound
Jesse Shriki, DO, MS; Paul Beeston, MD; Jason Grimsman, DO; Carl Mitchell, MD; Pedro Roque, MD; Jeremy Rowlett, MD 
Point of Care ultrasound for the Emergency provider

Objectives:

  • Review physicsnecessary to interpret  ultrasound
  • Identify sonoanatomy of the peritoneum where free fluid may collect in trauma
  • Identify sonoanatomy of the abdominal aorta and IVC
  • Review anatomy necessary to interpret Cardiac echocardiography for point of care     
8:00 am - 11:00 am Workshop: Simulation Lab (OTHER TIME SLOTS OFFERED)  
Steven A. Godwin, MD, FACEP; Dave Caro, MD; Petra Duran-Gehring, MD; Lisa Jacobson, MD; Todd Wylie, MD 
This workshop will provide interactive feedback with bedside instructors as students perform simulated patient care scenarios and procedures. Challenging scenarios will involve clinical decision making in areas of critical care, trauma, pediatrics and airway management. Learners will also be able to practice ultrasound guided techniques for patients with difficult access.

Objectives: 

  • Learners will be able to describe and demonstrate the approach to the patient with undifferentiated shock.
  • Learners will be able to describe and identify characteristics of a difficult airway.
  • Learners will be able to demonstrate fluid resuscitation in the presence of sepsis shock.
  • Learners will demonstrate ultrasound guided techniques in vascular access.   
8:00 am - 11:00 am Workshop: Slit Lamp Skills Lab (OTHER TIME SLOTS OFFERED)  
Jason Wilson, MD 
During this hands on workshop, participants will rotate among 3 stations, and the basics of slit lamp equipment and examination for the emergency provider will be described.Stations will include removal of foreign bodies from simulated eyes, a review of application and use of different types of tonometers, and review of a slideshow to present and discuss various ophthalmologic pathologies.

Objectives: 

  • Identify the essentials of slit lamp examination.
  • Review the ophthalmologic diseases that mandate slit lamp examination and intraocular pressure evaluation.
  • Demonstrate approaches to foreign body removal.
  • Identify and use various types of tonometers.
  • Discuss common eye disorders and their presentations.   
12:00 pm - 3:00 pm Workshop: Advanced Emergency Ultrasound
Jesse Shriki, DO, MS; Paul Beeston, MD; Jason Grimsman, DO; Carl Mitchell, MD; Pedro Roque, MD; Jeremy Rowlett, MD 
Emergency bedside ultrasound enhances patient care and improves patient safety. In the advanced emergency ultrasound courses, participants will learn how to perform diagnostic and life-saving bedside scans. Faculty will provide informative lectures, followed by small group scanning sessions where participants will have the opportunity to reinforce and augment their skills.

Objectives: 

  • Review of anatomy necessary to interpret Biliary/Right upper quadrant ultrasound  
  • Review anatomy necessary to interpret musculoskeletal and ocular ultrasound
  • Identify sonoanatomy of the Deep Venous Systems  
12:00 pm - 3:00 pm Workshop: Simulation Lab (OTHER TIME SLOTS OFFERED)  
Steven A. Godwin, MD, FACEP; Dave Caro, MD; Petra Duran-Gehring, MD; Lisa Jacobson, MD; Todd Wylie, MD 
This workshop will provide interactive feedback with bedside instructors as students perform simulated patient care scenarios and procedures. Challenging scenarios will involve clinical decision making in areas of critical care, trauma, pediatrics and airway management. Learners will also be able to practice ultrasound guided techniques for patients with difficult access.

Objectives: 

  • Learners will be able to describe and demonstrate the approach to the patient with undifferentiated shock.
  • Learners will be able to describe and identify characteristics of a difficult airway.
  • Learners will be able to demonstrate fluid resuscitation in the presence of sepsis shock.
  • Learners will demonstrate ultrasound guided techniques in vascular access.    
12:00 pm - 3:00 pm Workshop: Slit Lamp Skills Lab (OTHER TIME SLOTS OFFERED)  
Jason Wilson, MD 
During this hands on workshop, participants will rotate among 3 stations, and the basics of slit lamp equipment and examination for the emergency provider will be described.Stations will include removal of foreign bodies from simulated eyes, a review of application and use of different types of tonometers, and review of a slideshow to present and discuss various ophthalmologic pathologies.

Objectives: 

  • Identify the essentials of slit lamp examination.
  • Review the ophthalmologic diseases that mandate slit lamp examination and intraocular pressure evaluation.
  • Demonstrate approaches to foreign body removal.
  • Identify and use various types of tonometers.
  • Discuss common eye disorders and their presentations.   
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Masquerade Party: Systemic Causes of Abdominal Pain
Robert Vissers, MD, FACEP 
Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints presenting to the emergency department, representing 5-10% of all visits. Up to 50% of patients remain undiagnosed at discharge and diagnostic accuracy of initial impression is 50-65% compared to final diagnosis. Up to 10% of these patients have a serious extra-abdominal process,presenting with abdominal pain, leading to misdiagnosis. A diagnostic strategy which considers possible systemic causes, is essential to avoid missed diagnoses, including infectious inflammatory, toxic and hematologic disease.Certain historical, physical and lab findings are associated with systemic causes. Systemic causes of abdominal pain.

Objectives: 

  • Develop a diagnostic approach to undifferentiated abdominal pain.
  • Expand your differential to include unusual, systemic causes.
  • Understand the role of the lab as a clue to unusual, systemic causes.  
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm Evaluation and Management of the Crashing Trauma Patient
Andrew Perron, MD, FACEP  
The care of the trauma patient is frequently algorythmic as dictated by the ATLS guidelines. While these are a good common starting point,there are a wide variety of nuances, pitfalls, and lessons to be learned from the Emergency Medicine literature. Using a case-based format we will review some focused areas on the care of the crashing trauma patient.

Objectives: 

  • Understand why "stable" trauma patients can become unstable
  • Know the most efficient way to rule in or out specific life-threats common in the trauma patient population.
  • Understand the evidence-based practice of caring for this "sickest-of-the-sick" population  
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm One Pill CAN Kill
Sean Nordt, MD 
Lecture on potentially toxic agents in pediatrics.

Objectives: 

  • Become familiar with toxins that can harm children in small doses
  • Discuss the mechanism of toxicity of these agents
  • Develop a treatment strategy for these toxins   

Monday, May 4, 2015

8:00 am - 9:00 am Advances in Procedural Sedation and Analgesia
Robert Vissers, MD, FACEP 
PSA can be used to facilitate procedural success and provide patient comfort. Although very safe in the emergency setting, there have been identified risks associated with procedural sedation, particularly with certain higher risk patients. Attention to patient and drug selection, sedation planning, and patient monitoring can prevent potential complications such as apnea, hypoxia or hypotension.

Objectives: 

  • Understand the pharmacology of agents used in procedural sedation.
  • Reduce complications through appropriate monitoring strategies.
  • Safely use procedural sedation in complex, ill patients.   
9:00 am - 10:00 am Dangers From the Sea: Marine Envenomation and Seafood Poisoning
Sean Nordt, MD 
Discussion of more commonly encountered venomous marine animals and seafood poisoning.

Objectives: 

  • Describe the clinical presentation following common marine envenomations
  • Develop a treatment plan for these envenomations
  • Be able to discuss mechanism of toxins from seafood poisoning
  • Demonstrate techniques to minimize seafood poisoning   
10:30 am - 11:30 am High Risk Orthopedic Emergencies: Can't Miss Diagnoses for the EMPA
Andrew Perron, MD, FACEP  
The ED provides a great deal of orthopedic care to our patients. While much of this care is fairly routine,there are some "high risk" diagnoses that should make the emergency medicine practitioner pay special attention to avoid some common (and avoidable) pitfalls. In this session we will review compartment syndrome, hip dislocation, supracondylar humerus fracture, posterior shoulder dislocation,and sternoclavicular dislocation looking for pearls and pitfalls in the care of these injuries.

Objectives: 

  • Identify what injuries presenting to the ED are at higher risk for "pitfalls"
  • Know specific steps to take in order to avoid the most common diagnostic pitfalls in the care of these patients.
  • Understand the specific interventions for these injuries that lead to the best outcomes.   
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm Pictures to Ponder: Pediatric Visual Diagnosis
Mimi Lu, MD 
Emergency providers must integrate a brief, focused history and physical examination with different visual clues in order to develop an accurate diagnosis. The speaker will present a variety of images of common, uncommon, and potentially life-threatening conditions. The presenter will provide the audience with clinical pearls for the diagnosis and management of these interesting pediatric cases that everyone who cares for children should know.

Objectives: 

  • Identify deadly rashes
  • Identify skin manifestations of systemic disease
  • Recognize common pediatric dermatologic conditions that may mimic life-threatening etiologies   
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Practice Changing Acute Care Medicine Literature Review: 2015 (Part I)
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP; Robert Dachs, MD 
The Emergency and Acute Care Medicine medical literature continues to be published at an ever increasing rate. It is essential for acute care clinicians to be aware of high quality,evidence-based, and clinically relevant research that can improve the care provided to patients. However, busy clinicians cannot easily conduct comprehensive reviews of recent publications, grade their degree of rigor, and determine if they are influential enough to change practice. This presentation will provide Physician Assistants with summary reviews of recent high-value publications that should influence management plan decision making. The grade of evidence quality will be identified for each article presented. Several Take Home Points will be provided for each article.

Objectives:

A list of topics cannot be provided at this time since publication selection will be made much closer to the conference date in order to ensure that the most recent information possible is presented.

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Pearls and Pitfalls in Pediatric Radiology
Mimi Lu, MD 
In the pediatric patient, key radiographic findings can often be subtle and easy to miss. The speaker will review important and potentially life-threatening findings found on pediatric radiographs. Cases that are specific to the pediatric population including cardiac, abdominal, traumatic, and infectious disease emergencies will be reviewed.

Objectives: 

  • Establish a systematic approach to interpreting chest radiographs.
  • Discuss common and uncommon findings in pediatric radiology.
  • Identify pitfalls in interpreting pediatric radiographs.
  • Acknowledge radiation risk in pediatrics.  
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm Roundtable: The Latest on PA Certification and the EM CAQ
Greg Thomas, PA, MPH  
Need to know what to do to maintain your NCCPA certification? Then this session is a MUST for you! In this session, we will discuss the enhancements to the certification maintenance process that will incorporate additional competencies, and we will review examples of Self-assessment and Performance Improvement CME. You will also have a chance to learn the latest on our Emergency Medicine CAQ program!

Objectives: 

  • Achieve a better understanding of the new certification maintenance requirements to be implemented in 2014,
  • Review examples of Self-assessment and Performance Improvement CME and recognize the benefits of each activity, and
  • Have a better understanding of the Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQ) program in Emergency Medicine.  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Ultrasound Guided Procedures
Jesse Shriki, DO, MS; Paul Beeston, MD; Jason Grimsman, DO; Carl Mitchell, MD; Pedro Roque, MD; Jeremy Rowlett, MD 
Point of Care ultrasound for the Emergency provider.

Objectives: 

  • Review physics necessary to interpret ultrasound
  • Identify sonoanatomy of the peritoneum where free fluid may collect in trauma
  • Review anatomy necessary to interpret Biliary/Right upper quadrant ultrasound
  • Identify sonoanatomy of the abdominal aorta
  • Review anatomy necessary to interpret musculo skeletal and ocular ultrasound
  • Identify sonoanatomy of the Deep Venous Systems
  • Review sonoanatomy for the use of procedural emergency medicine.  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Slit Lamp Skills Lab (OTHER TIME SLOTS OFFERED)  
Jason Wilson, MD 
During this hands on workshop, participants will rotate among 3 stations, and the basics of slit lamp equipment and examination for the emergency provider will be described.Stations will include removal of foreign bodies from simulated eyes, a review of application and use of different types of tonometers, and review of a slideshow to present and discuss various ophthalmologic pathologies.

Objectives: 

  • Identify the essentials of slit lamp examination.
  • Review the ophthalmologic diseases that mandate slit lamp examination and intraocular pressure evaluation.
  • Demonstrate approaches to foreign body removal.
  • Identify and use various types of tonometers.
  • Discuss common eye disorders and their presentations.  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Diagnosis and Management of Common Joint Dislocations
Amy Keim, MS, PA-C ; James Marinucci; Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPH, MPAS; Andrew Maurano, PA-C 
This is a case-based workshop that will work through the diagnosis, management, pearls, and pitfalls of common adult joint dislocations. Participants will also learn key procedures inthe management of common joint dislocations including: interphalangeal reduction techniques, digit blocks, shoulder reduction techniques,intra-articular anesthesia, elbow reduction techniques, hip reduction techniques, and patella reduction.

Objectives: 

  • Understand classifications and mechanisms associated with common dislocations
  • Perform appropriate motor/neurological examination for common joint dislocations
  • Perform an appropriate vascular examination for common joint dislocations
  • Recognize common joint dislocations on x-ray
  • Perform peripheral blocks and hematoma blocks for joint reduction pain management
  • Demonstrate methods of joint reduction
  • Know the indications and methods of reduced dislocations immobilization
  • Understand complications of joint dislocations and reductions
  • Make appropriate referrals to specialist consultants  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Simulation Lab (OTHER TIME SLOTS OFFERED)  
Steven A. Godwin, MD, FACEP; Dave Caro, MD; Petra Duran-Gehring, MD; Lisa Jacobson, MD; Todd Wylie, MD 
This workshop will provide interactive feedback with bedside instructors as students perform simulated patient care scenarios and procedures. Challenging scenarios will involve clinical decision making in areas of critical care, trauma, pediatrics and airway management. Learners will also be able to practice ultrasound guided techniques for patients with difficult access.

Objectives: 

  • Learners will be able to describe and demonstrate the approach to the patient with undifferentiated shock.
  • Learners will be able to describe and identify characteristics of a difficult airway.
  • Learners will be able to demonstrate fluid resuscitation in the presence of sepsis shock.
  • Learners will demonstrate ultrasound guided techniques in vascular access.    

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

8:00 am - 9:00 am Reading an Abdominal CT: What Every PA Needs to Know
Joshua Broder, MD, FACEP 
Using a case-based format,the presenter will review common and dangerous conditions diagnosed by abdominal CT. Indications for CT and interpretation and limitations of imaging will be discussed. The role of contrast agents will also be described.

Objectives: 

  • Describe indications for abdominal CT
  • Review interpretation of images
  • Discuss the role of contrast agents
  • Highlight limitations of CT  
9:00 am - 10:00 am Practice Changing Acute Care Medicine Literature Review: 2015 (Part II)
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP; Robert Dachs, MD 
The Emergency and Acute Care Medicine medical literature continues to be published at an ever increasing rate. It is essential for acute care clinicians to be aware of high quality,evidence-based, and clinically relevant research that can improve the care provided to patients. However, busy clinicians cannot easily conduct comprehensive reviews of recent publications, grade their degree of rigor, and determine if they are influential enough to change practice. This presentation will provide Physician Assistants with summary reviews of recent high-value publications that should influence management plan decision making. The grade of evidence quality will be identified for each article presented. Several Take Home Points will be provided for each article.

Objectives:

A list of topics cannot be provided at this time since publication selection will be made much closer to the conference date in order to ensure that the most recent information possible is presented.

10:30 am - 11:30 am Avoiding Abdominal Apocalypse
Joshua Broder, MD, FACEP 
Using a case-based format,the presenter will highlight pitfalls of history, physical exam, and diagnostic tests that may delay the recognition and treatment of time-sensitive, dangerous abdominal conditions.

Objectives: 

  • Describe key elements of history and physical exam that can reveal a diagnosis, or, when omitted, result in diagnostic failure.
  • Describe limits of laboratory and imaging tests for dangerous abdominal conditions
  • Discuss the role of CT contrast agents for some pathological processes
  • Describe the importance of therapeutic interventions for time-sensitive abdominal processes   
12:30 am – 1:30 pm From X-rays to Antibiotics: Difficult Decisions in the Pregnant Patient
Alfred Sacchetti, MD, FACEP   
This course will exam the diagnostic and therapeutic options for the management of pregnant patients with a wide spectrum of medical and surgical emergencies.

Objectives: 

  • Understand the risks associated with diagnostic options for the evaluation of pregnant patients.
  • List therapeutic options available for the treatment of medical and surgical conditions in the pregnant patient.
  • Develop a technique forex plaining to patients their options in both diagnostic and therapeutic management  
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Read Em or Weep...Recent Articles in Critical Care
Michael Winters, MD, FACEP 
The field of emergency medicine critical care is rapidly growing. The emergency provider who is able to apply the latest, evidence-based concepts in resuscitation can often make the difference between life and death. The speaker will discuss important game-changing articles from the recent critical care literature that can help the emergency provider in the care of the critically ill ED patient.

Objectives: 

  • Identify recent articles from the critical care literature applicable to emergency medicine.
  • Discuss the incorporation of new evidence into the care of critically ill emergency department patients.  
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm Approach to the Febrile Child 2015
Alfred Sacchetti, MD, FACEP 
This will present an evidenced based approach to the care of children under 2 years of age with fevers.  A separate discussion will beincluded on unvaccinated children.

Objectives: 

  • Understand the spectrum of diseases which may produce fevers in children.
  • Understand the appropriate work up of febrile children.
  • Understand which children can safely be managed without any laboratory studies.  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Essential ENT Procedures
Amy Keim, MS, PA-C ; James Marinucci; Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPH, MPAS; Andrew Maurano, PA-C
This is a case-based workshop that will work through the diagnosis, management, pearls, and pitfalls of managing ENT emergencies commonly presenting to the ER. Procedures included peratonsilar abscess drainage, anterior and posterior nasal packing techniques,oral incision and drainage, foreign body removal techniques, hematoma evacuations and pressure dressings, ear laceration and torn earlobe repair.

Objectives: 

  • Control anterior and posterior epistaxis with a variety of nasal packing techniques and newer generation epistaxis products
  • Assess and manage dental and peritonsilar abscesses
  • Apply a variety of techniques in managing nasal and ear foreign bodies
  • Perform auricular anesthesia blocks
  • Appropriately manage auricular hematomas
  • Manage ear lacerations,including those with cartilage involvement 
  • Properly repair acutely torn earlobes   
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Procedures They Never Taught You that will change your practice (THIS IS A DIDACTIC WORKSHOP AND NOT HANDS ON)
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP 
Easily mastered bedside procedures can benefit patients and add professional satisfaction to the life of a Physician Assistant. Many of these are learned “on the job”. This presentation will review mechanisms of common injuries and discuss in detail maneuvers that will correct them.

The following conditions will be reviewed: 

  • Scalp lacerations
  • Occipital neuralgia
  • Vertigo (Epley Maneuver)
  • Orbital compartment syndrome
  •  Peritonsillar abscess
  • Tooth avulsion
  • Temporomandibular jointsubluxation
  • Posterior sterno-claviculardislocation
  • Tension pneumothorax
  • Shoulder dislocations
  • Nursemaid’s elbow
  • Transthecal digital blocks
  • Subungual hematoma
  • Hip dislocation  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Advanced Airway Management
Ken Butler, DO, FACEP 
Course provides an In-depth look at effective airway management techniques that you will actually use in your next emergency airway.Instruction on skills and strategies for adult and pediatric intubation to promote patient safety and Increase provider confidence.

Topics covered include: 

  • Orotracheal Intubation
  • Laryngoscopy
  • Surgical Airways (cricothyrotomy, tracheotomy)
  • Video Laryngoscopy
  • Fiberoptic Intubation
  • Nasotracheal Intubation
  • Pediatric Intubation
  • Rescue Ventilation devices such as the Laryngeal Mask Airway   

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

8:00 am - 9:00 am Hypertensive Emergencies: Mistakes You Don't Want to Make
Michael Winters, MD, FACEP 
Hypertensive emergencies are often quoted as one of the “most mismanaged of all medical conditions”. Critical end-organ dysfunction from extremes of blood pressure must be promptly diagnosed and treated. Unfortunately, many patients have their blood pressure excessively lowered beyond recommended targets, thereby increasing this risk of adverse outcomes. The speaker will discuss critical pearls and pitfalls in the management of patients with life-threatening conditions resulting from dangerous elevations in blood pressure.

Objectives: 

  • Identify pitfalls in the ED treatment of hypertensive emergencies.
  • Describe an evidence-based approach to initiating intravenous anti hypertensive medications in select hypertensive emergencies.
  • List the preferred anti hypertensive medications for select hypertensive emergencies. 
9:00 am - 10:00 am The Pregnant Trauma Patient
Rebecca Bavolek, MD 
Traumatic injury is a major cause for morbidity and mortality of the pregnant patient. The speaker will  discuss the relevant changes in anatomy physiology during pregnancy and how it affects trauma management. The steps for assessment and treatment of the trauma patient will be reviewed. Diagnostic imaging may be necessary, and the considerations of what type of imaging is helpful in the setting of a traumatically injured pregnant patient will be reviewed. Finally, the indications,  contraindications,and procedural approach to the peri-mortem c-section will be discussed.

Objectives: 

  • Review physiologic and anatomic changes in pregnancy and how that alters stabilization and management of the pregnant patient.
  • Discuss the primary and secondary survey with respect to evaluating the pregnant patient.
  • Discuss adjuncts to the trauma resuscitation such as radiologic imaging.
  • Describe when and how to perform a peri-mortem c-section. 
10:30 am - 11:30 am Post-Arrest Care: Interventions That Save Lives
Michael Winters, MD, FACEP   
Care of the patient with ROSC following sudden cardiac death is challenging. Recent evidence has demonstrated that a comprehensive approach to the “post-arrest” patient can increase the chances of meaningful recovery. The speaker will discuss a systematic approach to the management of patients with ROSC following cardiac arrest. Emphasis is placed on optimizing oxygenation and ventilation, maintaining adequate perfusion pressure, initiating targeted temperature management, and identifying patients appropriate for emergent cardiac catheterization.

Objectives: 

  • List the goals for oxygenation and ventilation in the post-arrest ED patient.
  • Discuss current controversies and recommendations on the use of targeted temperature management for post-arrest patients.
  • Identify post-arrest patients who require emergent cardiac catheterization. 
11:30 am - 12:30 pm Town Hall Meeting: SEMPA Update and Membership Meeting
SEMPA Board of Directors   
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Pregnancy Emergencies You NEED to Know!
Rebecca Bavolek, MD 
The pregnant patient in the emergency causes anxiety for the patient and the practitioner alike. The speaker will discuss the presentation of non-traumatic pregnancy related emergencies by trimester as well as the proper diagnostic modalities and treatment. In addition, the speaker will discuss other emergent medical conditions that pregnant women may be prone to developing, how to recognize them, and ultimately diagnose and treat them.

Objectives: 

  • Discuss the causes of vaginal bleeding and how the causes and treatment vary by trimester.
  • Discuss hypertension in pregnancy and when it is cause to suspect an emergent presentation.
  • Discuss medical condition snot directly related to pregnancy, but are more prevalent in pregnancy.
  • Discuss possible diagnostic imaging modalities for the emergent presentation of the pregnant patient and review the risks and benefits of each. 
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Emergencies in the Elder Patient
Diane  Birnbaumer, MD, FACEP 
Elderly patients presenting for emergency care pose a high risk situation where a life threat may be hiding behind a vague and seemingly benign chief complaint. In a case-based format, this lecture will cover some of these issues.

Objectives: 

  • Discuss how to recognize a potential case of elder abuse.
  • Explain the injury patterns of elderly trauma patients and how they differ from those in a younger patient.
  • List the potential life threats that may present as abdominal pain in an elderly patient. 
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm Myths in Emergency Medicine
Kevin Klauer, DO, FACEP 
Description: The speaker will address common myths in medicine resulting in operational inefficiency,unnecessary expense or patient safety issues. The historical perspective will be explored with respect to various topics, highlighting that lack of evidence in support of many accepted practices in Emergency Medicine and medicine in general.

Objectives: 

  • Incorporate into practice the current practice standards based on the current literature.
  • Develop ways to improve efficiency based on the current literature.
  • Develop ways to improve patient safety based on the current literature.  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Critical Management for Acute Hand Injuries and Infections
Amy Keim, MS, PA-C ; James Marinucci; Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPH, MPAS; Andrew Maurano, PA-C 
More and more, emergency medicine PAs are being entrusted to handle simple to complex hand injuries and infections. Proper assessment and management is essential to ensuring good outcomes for the patient, and the PA. This workshop empowers emergency medicine providers with the critical knowledge and the most essential skills in managing acute hand injuries and infections within the setting of the ER.

Objectives: 

  • Perform a proper hand exam,identify and quantify deficits, and understand the significance of specific abnormal findings.
  • Identify and manage common hand fractures and dislocations
  • Choose appropriate methods of immobilizing hand injuries and infections
  • Properly apply a variety of immobilization materials including aluminum, pre-formed and fiberglass splinting materials
  • Identify and manage a variety of hand infections including paronychias, felons and tensosynovitis
  • Perform proper peripheral anesthesia techniques including digit blocks and wrist level nerve blocks
  • Manage a variety of acute finger injuries including distal tip amputations, nails plate and nail bed lacerations
  • Perform a variety of advanced wound repair techniques in the management of hand trauma  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: EKG Patterns You Do Not Want to Miss
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP 
Diagnostic electrocardiography is an essential skill required of clinicians in many specialties. Patients with chest pain, palpitations, syncope, shortness of breath, and mental status change regularly present unexpectedly for evaluation.An ECG is routinely ordered in these situations, and major treatment decisions often are driven off the interpretation of this test. These presentations will familiarize Physician Assistants with a number of ECG abnormalities that they are likely to encounter during their careers.

The following conditions which provide ECG clues will be reviewed: 

  • Acute posterior myocardial infarction
  • Acute right ventricular infarction
  • Acute myocardial infarction in the presence of LBBB
  • Recognizing SVT with aberrancy and differentiating it from VT
  • Wolf –Parkinson-White and Lown-Ganong-Levine Syndromes
  • ECG changes associated with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorhage
  • ECG changes associated with tricyclic antidepressant toxicity
  • Heart blocks
  • Wellen’s Syndrome
  • Brugada Syndrome
  • Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
  • ECG changes associated with heart transplantation
  • Dressler’s Syndrome
  • Left ventricular aneurysm  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Dental Procedures and Blocks  for the Non-Dentist
Kip Benko, MD, FACEP; Denise Ramponi, DNP, ENP-BC, FAEN, FAANP; Joseph Mattis, CRNP; Mary Jo Cerepani, DNP, FNP-BC, CEN 
This interactive skill workshop will review the most common dental emergencies which frequently present to the emergency department, clinic, or urgent care center. Dental pain and caries, dental fractures, loose and avulsed teeth, as well as dry sockets,post-extraction bleeding and loose appliances (caps, crowns, filling) will be discussed. Dental and facial regional anesthesia will be reviewed utilizingcase presentations and video. Simulation of the dental injections with capped syringes will be approximated on partners. Dental medicaments, glues and pastes will be mixed and applied to dental models. New techniques to remedy and cure apthous ulcers will be discussed.

Objectives: 

  • The clinician will acquire the confidence and skill set required to diagnose and treat the most common presenting dental emergencies. 
  • The clinician will gain a better understanding of dental anesthetics and dental anesthetic equipment, along with the techniques necessary to perform supraperiosteal injections and infraorbital, inferior alveolar and mental nerve blocks. 
  • The clinician will gain experience in using common dental materials to cover tooth fractures, seal dental caries and splint loosened (subluxed, luxated) teeth. Loosened fillings,crowns and caps will also be discussed. 
  • The clinician will become knowledgeable with regard to the initial treatment of dry sockets, post extraction hemorrhage and apthous ulcers.  

Thursday, May 7, 2015

8:00 am - 9:00 am High Risk Emergency Medicine…How to Reduce Your Risk!
Kevin Klauer, DO, FACEP 
The speaker will discuss the risk management climate in Emergency Medicine and focus on clinical entities,which frequently create risk for EM providers. The discussion will include closed claims cases to illustrate how to avoid medical malpractice claims and the unfortunate outcomes that may occur as a result of such claims.

Objectives: 

  • Incorporate into practice strategies to identify high risk features of clinical entities in Emergency Medicine
  • Develop strategies to improve patient safety
  • Identify opportunities to reduce professional liability in the practice of Emergency Medicine  
9:00 am - 10:00 am Travel-Related Illnesses
Diane  Birnbaumer, MD, FACEP
From travelers diarrhea to Ebola, international travel exposes the adventuresome and the feint-hearted to potential infections. This lecture will cover both the common and the more recently concerning infections that may be acquired by a traveler.

Objectives: 

  • Explain the infections that might be acquired in international travel.
  • Discuss how these patients may present to the emergency department. 
  • List the serious causes of infections in a traveler and what to do if you suspect one of these infections.   
10:30 am - 11:30 am The Epidemic of Prescription Drug Abuse and Its Effect on the Emergency Department
Maureen  McCollough, MD, FACEP 
The U.S. is in the middle of a opiate epidemic. For years we as healthcare providers have been pushed by legislators and the Joint Commission to treat pain. Unfortunately we now face the issues of much higher addiction rates and higher death rates associated with prescription pain killers. Prescription pain deaths in the U.S. have exceeded motor vehicle accidents and deaths due to other drugs like cocaine and heroine. This lecture will look at the history of the epidemic, how we got to where we are and what the healthcare system is doing to correct it.

Objectives: 

  • Understand the history behind the pain treatment mandates that have been pushed for the last 20 years.
  • Understand the statistics on the ever increasing opiate epidemic In this country.
  • Understand how EDs can have a positive influence on this epidemic by practicing Safe Pain Medication Prescribing guidelines.  
11:30 am – 12:30 pm The Brave New World of Anticoagulation: An EMPA's Nightmare
Diane  Birnbaumer, MD, FACEP 
Novel anticoagulants offer benefits over the traditional warfarin and have been approved for the treatment and prevention of strokes and venous thromboembolic disease. While these agents have much to offer, emergency practitioners have to deal with the conundrum of how to treat these patients when the develop serious and life threatening bleeding. This lecture will cover the issues related to these agents in the emergency setting.

Objectives: 

  • Explain how to reverse severe bleeding in a patient on warfarin.
  • Discuss the benefits of the novel oral anticoagulants when compared to warfarin.
  • List the options available to reverse severe bleeding in a patient on a novel anticoagulant.  

 

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Virtual SEMPA 2014 II

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