April 6-10, 2017 | Phoenix, AZ

Workshop & Educational Session Descriptions

 

Wednesday, March 30, 2016 

8:00 am - 3:00 pm Workshop: Critical Care Symposium: Resuscitating the Crashing ED Patient (Six-Hour Course) 
Haney Mallemat, MD & Michael Winters, MD, FACEP, MD 
In recent years, the annual hours of critical care delivered by emergency providers has grown over 200%! It is during these early hours of illness, when the patient is in the emergency department, that many pathologic processes begin to take hold. It is during these early hours of illness when lives can be saved…or lost! It is crucial that emergency providers be expert at resuscitating the crashing patient. This Critical Care Symposium is an outstanding resuscitation course for the emergency medicine physician assistant that encompasses a broad spectrum of topics including undifferentiated shock, fluid resuscitation, the crashing obese patient, anaphylaxis, and mechanical ventilation pearls and pitfalls. 

Objectives:    
At the conclusion of the symposium the participant should be able to:

  • Describe a standardized approach to the evaluation and management of emergency department patients with undifferentiated shock.
  • Discuss the use of balanced fluid solutions in the resuscitation of select critically ill emergency department patients.
  • Describe a step-wise approach to the ventilated ED patient who develops hypotension.
  • Discuss the incorporation of new evidence into the care of critically ill emergency department patients. 
8:00 am - 11:00 am Workshop: Basic Ultrasound Workshop
Teresa Wu, MD, FACEP
Emergency ultrasound is the medical use of ultrasound technology for the bedside evaluation of emergency medical conditions and diagnoses, resuscitation of the acutely ill, critically ill or injured, procedural guidance, monitoring of certain pathophysiologic states and as an adjunct to therapy. Emergency ultrasound examinations are performed and interpreted by acute care practitioners or those under the supervision of acute care practitioners at the patient’s side.  The basic emergency ultrasound course will cover the core ultrasound applications that all acute care practitioners are encouraged to utilize in the evaluation, management and resuscitation of patients at the bedside.  

Objectives:  
At the conclusion of this workshop, the participant will be able to: 

  • Describe a standardized approach to the evaluation and management of emergency department patients with undifferentiated shock.
  • Discuss the use of balanced fluid solutions in the resuscitation of select critically ill emergency department patients.
  • Describe a step-wise approach to the ventilated ED patient who develops hypotension.
  • Discuss the incorporation of new evidence into the care of critically ill emergency department patients 
8:00 am - 11:00 am Workshop: Essential ENT Procedures
Amy Keim, PA-C MS, Drew Maurano PA-C,  Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPAS, MPH, James Marinucci
Every ER provider should have solid ENT emergency management skills, yet there are limited opportunities to develop skills through hands-on learning. This is a case-based workshop that will work through the diagnosis, management, pearls, and pitfalls of managing ENT emergencies commonly presenting to the ER and Urgent Care.  Participants will work with  tools, techniques and tricks of the trade to develop the  skills required to perform the most essential emergency ENT procedures. 


Objectives:  
At the conclusion of this hands-on workshop, participants should be able to:  

  • Control anterior epistaxis with a variety of nasal packing techniques and newer epistaxis products
  • Assess and manage dental and peritonsilar abscesses
  • Apply a variety of techniques in managing nasal and ear foreign bodies 
  • Perform auricular anesthesia nerve blocks
  • Appropriately manage auricular hematomas
  • Appropriately manage septal hematomas
  • Perform indirect laryngoscopy
  • Manage complex  ear lacerations, including those with cartilage involvement
  • Properly repair acutely torn earlobes 
8:00 am - 10:00 am Secrets of the Chest X-Ray Masters
Joshua Broder, MD, FACEP
Emergency Providers must make critical, time-sensitive decisions based on chest x-ray and are often the first to interpret images, before a radiologist.  Emergency Providers must master chest x-ray interpretation because crucial decisions such as therapies for pneumonia, hemo- and pneumothorax, pulmonary edema, aortic pathology, and pericardial fluid can depend on chest x-ray results.  The speaker will review often-missed pathology, plus time-efficient techniques for reading chest x-ray, revealing secrets to time-sensitive emergency diagnoses.  

Objectives:  

  • Review life-threatening and subtle findings on chest x-ray for medical, surgical, and traumatic conditions
  • Reveal advanced techniques used by radiologists to distinguish between radiographically similar conditions
  • Determine diagnostic pitfalls of chest x-ray 
12:00 pm - 3:00 pm Advanced Ultrasound Workshop
Teresa Wu, MD, FACEP
Emergency, point-of-care ultrasound has been shown to improve patient care and enhance patient safety.  Bedside ultrasound can be used in the assessment, diagnosis, and management of patients in the acute care setting.  The advanced emergency ultrasound course will cover innovative ways in which practitioners can utilize point-of-care ultrasound to refine patient assessment and management options. 


Objectives:  

  • Describe how to incorporate advanced ultrasound applications into their clinical practice.
  • Demonstrate how to perform advanced ultrasound scans such as ocular and musculoskeletal ultrasound.
  • Perform advanced ultrasound guided procedures.   
 
12:00 pm - 3:00 pm Critical Management Skills for Acute Hand Injuries & Infections
James Marinucci, Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPAS, MPH, Drew Maurano PA-C, Amy Keim, PA-C MS
Hand injuries and infections present frequently to the ER and Urgent Care yet too often they are poorly understood and/or mismanaged.  Every ER/ UC provider should possess the essential assessment and management skills critical to ensuring good outcomes for the patient, and the provider.  This workshop empowers providers with the core knowledge and skills to manage acute hand injuries and infections within the setting of the ER or urgent care.   

Objectives:
At the completion of this hands-on workshop, participants should be able to:

  •  Perform a proper hand exam, identify and quantify deficits, and understand the significance of specific abnormal findings.
  • Identify and manage common hand fractures and dislocations
  • Choose appropriate methods of immobilizing hand injuries and infections
  • Properly apply a variety of immobilization materials including aluminum, pre-formed and fiberglass splinting materials
  • Identify and manage a variety of hand infections including paronychias, felons and tensosynovitis
  • Perform proper peripheral anesthesia techniques including digit blocks and wrist level nerve blocks 
  • Manage a variety of acute finger injuries including distal tip amputations, nails plate and nail bed lacerations
  • Perform a variety of advanced wound repair techniques in the management of hand trauma   
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Secrets of the Head CT Masters
Joshua Broder, MD, FACEP
Emergency Providers must make critical, time-sensitive decisions based on head CT and are often the first to interpret images, before a radiologist. Emergency providers must master head CT interpretation because crucial decisions such as the need for surgical intervention, eligibility for TPA administration, and safety of lumbar puncture depend on CT. 


Objectives:  

  • Review life-threatening and subtle findings on non-contrast and contrast-enhanced CT
  • Reveal advanced techniques used by radiologists to distinguish between radiographically similar conditions
  • Determine diagnostic pitfalls of head CT  
3:30 pm - 4:30 pm Cruising the Infectious Disease Literature
David Talan, MD, FACEP
Discussion of recent outbreaks, anti-vaccination movement, how the Surviving Sepsis Campaign got almost everything wrong, and new bacterial resistance problems for common ED infections.

Objectives:
  • What's going on with Ebola and MERS
  • Why people don't vaccinate and what to do about it
  • All the Surviving Sepsis Campaign recs that were wrong
  • How resistant Gram-negatives are becoming and ED problem  
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm      Practicing Excellence: How to Give Great Care and Feel Better at the End of Your Day
Jay Kaplan, MD, FACEP
The future is ahead of schedule. Declining reimbursement, transparency of quality and cost data, and the connection of payment to quality/cost metrics necessitates a change in how we do what we do. What has made us successful up to now will not make us successful in the near future. The patient's perception of care will constitute at least 1/4 of how our quality will be measured and so improving the patient experience is essential. Simultaneously we must focus on creating an efficient and fulfilling work environment for those giving care. This presentation will review simple tactics to improve the patient and provider experience of care.  


Objectives:  

  • Define the current state of health care and its challenges and difficulties, including new quality metrics, transparency, and pay for performance – why Service and Operational Excellence are important.
  • Define what Service and Operational Excellence is in the hospital and practice setting – how service and quality are interdependent in creating optimal clinical outcomes for patients 
  • Define best practices and tactics to implement better provider-patient communication, utilizing a high-performing provider self-test to facilitate improved behaviors and outcomes. 
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: Have Things Come to a Head?
David Talan, MD, FACEP
Discussion of most recent studies on treatment of skin and soft tissue infections, including value of adjunctive antibiotics for drained skin abscesses.

Objectives:  
  • How to treat abscesses
  • Which drugs to treat MRSA
  • How to recognize necrotizing fasciitis 
   

Thursday, March 31, 2016

8:00 am - 9:00 am All 'Stressed Out': How to Prevent Burnout
Jay Kaplan, MD, FACEP
The stressful aspects of emergency medicine are many, subtle, and cumulative. They can lead to job dissatisfaction, burnout, and compassion fatigue. Emergency providers work varying shifts and may suffer disruption of the their circadian rhythms. The presenter will identify the stressors in emergency medicine, explain the physiologic effects of those stressors, and provide proactive and real-time strategies and tactics for dealing with them effectively. 


Objectives:  

  • Identify the many sources of stress in the practice of emergency medicine.
  • Define the physiology of the stress response so that providers may better understand the effects on their health.
  • Describe strategies to handle the stress both pro-actively and real-time in order to optimize the enjoyment of practice and avoid burnout and compassion fatigue. 
9:30 am - 10:00 am  Emergency Medicine Tricks of the Trade: What the Textbooks Don't Teach You 
Teresa Wu, MD, FACEP
Often times, best practices come from clinical experience and the thoughtful exchange of pearls and pitfalls.  During this presentation, participants will be provided an overview of helpful tips and tricks that are useful in the management of patients in the acute care setting.  Many of these practice pearls are not found in textbooks.  At the end of the presentation, participants will be walk away with exciting knowledge, skills, and behaviors they can use to improve patient care. 


Objectives:  

  • Discuss novel tips and tricks they can use to help facilitate patient care.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of new ways to solve old problems. 
  • Describe innovative ways to utilize readily available equipment to trouble-shoot common issues in the emergency department. 
10:30 am - 11:30 am Fixing Faces Painlessly: Facial and Dental Anesthesia in Emergency Medicine
Kip Benko, MD, FACEP
Facial wounds can be a frightening and painful experience for the patient. Using illustrative cases and high definition video, the presenter will describe the anatomic approach to facial nerve blocks. These blocks may be used for local anesthesia to repair such regional facial trauma as eyelid lacerations or oral trauma and dental pain.

Objectives:
  • The attendees will gain an appreciation for the finer details of dental and facial neuroanatomy and their relevance in providing facial anesthetic blocks.
  • Attendees will be able to discuss the appropriate use of benzocaine, lidocaine and bupivacaine when providing facial anesthesia.
  • The attendees will be able to discuss in detail how to approach a supraperiosteal injection, infraorbital, inferior alveolar, mental and palatine blocks.
  • The potential complications and side effects of common facial anesthetics and techniques will be understood.
  • The clinician will be comfortable in dicussing the potential benefits/disadvantages of anesthetic techniques to the patient. 
11:30 am - 12:00 pm Dealing with Difficult Parents
Ghazala Sharieff, MD
This course will describe tips on how to handle difficult parents through case examples and the utilization of key phrases. 


Objectives:  

  • Discuss how to respond when demands for diagnostic testing are made
  • Define”best interest” as it applies to a pediatric patient
  • Develop effective strategies for dealing with demands by parents, guardians and other providers.
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm Nightmare ENT Emergencies: The Good, The Bad, and the Real Ugly
Teresa Wu, MD, FACEP, FACEP
ENT emergencies can be challenging and difficult to manage. During this presentation, participants will be provided with useful pearls and pitfalls in the evaluation and management of acute ENT emergencies.  Participants of this course will learn the most up-to-date treatment options based on recent literature and analysis of expert consensus on the topic. 


Objectives:  

  • Describe how they can effectively control epistaxis in the acute care setting.
  • Differentiate between the urgent and emergent causes of tracheostomy complications.
  • Identify and understand treatment options for emergent management of retrobulbar hematomas. 
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm Tales from the Crypt! Dental Emergencies in Emergency Medicine 
Kip Benko, MD, FACEP
Dental pain and traumatic injuries are common complaints in the ED. There are many important clinical clues the emergency physician should not miss when the patient's mouth is speaking out. Dental problems ranging from fractures to subluxations to dry sockets and odontalgia will be reviewed.  Abscesses will also be reviewed. Techniques for treating these injuries and producing effective pain management will be presented, and tips for recognizing those emergencies requiring immediate referral will be emphasized.

Objectives:  
  • The attendees will be able to discuss how a detailed knowledge of dental anatomy facilitates the approach to the patient with dental pain or dental trauma.
  • Attendees will be able to distinguish between enamel, dentin and pulp fractures and initiate treatment. Attendees will also be able to distinguish between abscess types and which need to be drained in the ED.
  • Attendees will be able to discuss luxation, subluxation and avulsion and
  • determine which reqUires emergency Intervention.
  • Both dry socket and bleeding will be discussed and the clinician will be able to initiate a stepwise approach to treatment.
  • The clinician will understand which dental emergencies requires emergent vs. urgent consultation and when the initiation of treatment in the ED or UCC modifies those consultation guidelines. 
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm Endovascular Resuscitation 
Zack Shinar, MD
Teach Physician Assistants about the ways vascular access and intravascular therapies can in aid in resuscitation of critical patients in the Emergency Department. 


Objectives:  

  • Gain experience and see value in arterial access during cardiac arrest
  • Explain REBOAs use in Trauma
  • Explain ECMOs use in Cardiac Arrest 
4:30 pm - 5:30 pm Roundtable: NCCPA Certification / Re-Certification Update
Greg Thomas, PA
Need to know what to do to maintain your NCCPA certification? Then this session is a MUST for you! We will review the enhancements to the certification maintenance process and discuss examples for both self-assessment and performance improvement CME. You’ll also have a chance to learn the latest on our CAQ program, now available for certified PAs in seven specialty areas of practice, and more. 


Objectives:
Attendees of this session will:

  • Achieve a better understanding of the new certification maintenance requirements,
  • Review examples of Self-assessment and Performance Improvement CME and recognize the benefits of each activity, and
  • Have a better understanding of the Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQ) program, available in seven specialties.  
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Critical Procedures in Emergency Medicine: A Hands On Experience (Also available on Friday)
Steven Godwin, MD, FACEP
This course is designed to help practitioners meet a significant number of their procedural requirements listed for EM Certificate of Added Qualifications.  We will provide expert instruction on procedural skills including Ultrasound Guided Vascular Access, Lumbar Puncture with and without Ultrasound Guidance, Tube Thoracostomy/Needle Decompression, Intra-Osseus, Thoracentesis and Defibrillation with transcutaneous pacing. 

Objectives:  

  • Learners will be able to demonstrate fluid resuscitation in the presence of sepsis shock.
  • Learners will demonstrate ultrasound guided techniques in vascular access.
  • Learners will be able to demonstrate proper lumbar puncture technique with and without ultrasound guidance
  • Learners will be able to place thoracostomy tubes.
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Ultrasound Guided Procedures
Jason Grimsman, DO 
This course will provide participants a foundation of knowledge for utilizing ultrasound to perform a variety of emergent procedures.  Through short didactic sessions followed by hands-on time, participants will develop an understanding of relevant anatomy and procedural technique, then will have time to demonstrate what they have learned and have hands-on experience with modern ultrasound machines and procedural task trainers. 


Objectives:  
Upon successful completion, participants will be able to:

  •  Recognize the utility of ultrasound in performing emergent procedures
  • Identify the relevant anatomy for those procedures on ultrasound
  • Be able to describe and demonstrate proper Ultrasound technique for: Venous Access (Both central and peripheral); Arthrocentesis; Lumbar puncture; aracentesis; and Thoracentesis
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Procedures They Never Taught You That Will Change Your Practice 
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP
Easily mastered bedside procedures can benefit patients and add professional satisfaction to the life of an Acute Care clinician.  Many of these are learned “on the job”.  This workshop will review common injuries and medical conditions and discuss in detail maneuvers that will benefit them. 


Objectives:  
The following conditions, among others, will be reviewed:

  • Scalp lacerations
  • Occipital neuralgia
  • Vertigo (Epley Maneuver)
  • Orbital compartment syndrome
  • Peritonsillar abscess
  • Tooth avulsion
  • Temporomandibular joint subluxation
  • Posterior sterno-clavicular dislocation
  • Tension pneumothorax
  • Shoulder dislocations
  • Nursemaid’s elbow
  • Transthecal digital blocks
  • Subungual hematoma
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Critical Management Skills for Acute Facial Injuries
Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPAS, MPH, Amy Keim, James Marinucci, PA-C MS, Drew Maurano PA-C
Identification and skillful management of acute facial injuries should be a part of every emergency medicine PA’s skill set.  Don’t rely on consultants or transfers to provide the care that you could be providing.  This workshop empowers emergency medicine providers with the critical knowledge and the most essential skills in managing acute facial injuries within the setting of the ER. 


Objectives:  

  •  At the completion of this hands-on workshop, participants should be able to:
  • Perform a proper face exam, identify critical deficits, and understand the significance of specific abnormal findings
  • Identify and manage common facial fractures and mandible dislocations
  • Evaluate, identify and manage occular trauma and perform a canthotomy
  • Provide proper nerve block anesthesia techniques for managing facial and dental trauma
  • Perform a variety of advanced wound repair techniques in the management of complex facial wounds
  • Perform a variety of advanced wound repair techniques in the management of intra-oral lacerations
  • Make appropriate consultations to specialists as indicated
3:30 pm - 5:30 pm Workshop: Secrets of the Abdominal CT Masters
Joshua Broder, MD, FACEP
Emergency Providers must make critical, time-sensitive decisions based on abdominal CT and are often the first to interpret images, before a radiologist.  Emergency Providers must master abdominal CT interpretation to guide timely interventions for aortic aneurysm, mesenteric ischemia, bowel perforation, and abdominal trauma. The speaker will review techniques including use of CT windows and PACS tools, plus time-efficient techniques for reading abdominal CT, revealing secrets to time-sensitive emergency diagnoses.  

Objectives:  

  • Review life-threatening and subtle findings on abdominal CT for medical, surgical, and traumatic conditions
  • Reveal advanced techniques used by radiologists to distinguish between radiographically similar conditions
  • Determine diagnostic pitfalls of abdominal CT, including evidence-based indications for oral and intravenous contrast agents

Friday, April 1, 2016

8:00 am - 9:00 am Bedside Procedures That Will Enrich Your Practice
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP & Robert Dachs, MD
The Emergency and Acute Care Medicine medical literature continues to be published at an ever increasing rate.  It is essential for acute care clinicians to be aware of high quality, evidence-based, and clinically relevant research that can improve the care provided to patients.  However, busy clinicians cannot easily conduct comprehensive reviews of recent publications, grade their degree of rigor, and determine if they are influential enough to change practice.  This presentation will provide summary reviews of recent high-value publications that should influence management plan decision making. The grade of evidence quality will be identified for each article presented.  


Objectives:  

  • A list of appropriate topics will be provided  as close to the conference date as possible in order to ensure that the most recent information is presented.
  • A quiz question will be presented at the beginning of each article reviewed to enhance content retention.
  • The grade of evidence quality will be identified for each article presented.  
  • Several summary Take-Home-Points will be provided for each article. 
9:00 am - 10:00 am Which Chest Pain Patients Can be Safely Discharged? New Data, New Perspectives
Michael Weinstock, MD
The course examines the next step in evaluation of emergency department chest pain: After a high risk patient is localized and the testing returns negative, what is the next step? Is outpatient evaluation safe? New data published in JAMA internal medicine in 2015 by Dr. Weinstock, principle investigator, attempts to answer these questions. 


Objectives:
 Learners will be able to:

  • Identify the real risk of a clinically relevant adverse cardiac event (CRACE) in emergency department chest pain patients after a negative evaluation
  • Understand atypical presentations of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and STEMI
  • Explore risks of hospitalization of low risk chest pain patients
10:30 am - 11:30 am To CT or Not to CT: Strategies to Decrease CT Utilization
Robert Dachs, MD
In the past 2 decades there has been an exponential rise in CT utilization. This course will explore some of the reasons for this meteoric rise and discuss some of the deleterious effects of overutilizatin of CT and ways to avoid unnecessary studies. 


Objectives:  
At the end of this course, the attendee will be able to:

  • Understand the deleterious consequences of excessive use of CT
  • Discuss the risk of harm vs. the risk of benefit associated with CT with their patients
  • Utilize clinical decision rules appropriately
  • Avoid the use of CT in very low risk - no risk conditions
11:30 am - 12:30 am Pediatric Emergency Medicine Literature Review
Richard Cantor, MD, FACEP
A review of the most clinically instructive literature in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

Objectives:  
  • Learners will become familiar with the most recent research in Pediatric Emergency Medicine
  • Learners will be able to incorporate this information into daily practice patterns
  • Learners will recognize trends and advances in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm How to Spot the Well-Appearing Patient Who Will Soon be Dead!
Michael Weinstock, MD
The course helps providers identify the most difficult ED patient: The well-appearing patient who has a life-threatening process occurring. It uses a unique 2 step approach to identify these patients then the '3 R's' to avoid missing a life ending diagnosis. 


Objectives:  

  • Identify well appearing patients with life-threating conditions
  • Understand when to reassess
  • Understand why these patients can be dismissed (CDR's - cognitive dispositions to respond)
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm

Mistakes You Don't Want To Make In Your Pediatric Patients
Richard Cantor, MD, FAAP, FACEP
A review of the most clinically instructive cases in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.  


Objectives:   

  • Learners will be able to become familiar with the most recent reasearch in Pediatric Emergency Medicine
  • Learners will be able to incorporate this information into daily practice patterns
  • Learners will be able to recognize trends and advances in Pediatric Emergency Medicine  
3:30 pm - 5:30 pm Roundtable: APP Leadership 
Krisi Gindlesperger, MPAS,  PA-C & Lynn Scherer, PA-C, MS

The goal of this roundtable is to provide participants with an opportunity to learn about leadership as it applies to Advanced Practice Providers (APPs). This roundtable will offer ideas on how to: Improve your leadership skills, how to implement those skills when asked to participate in leadership discussions, lead/manage your APP colleagues, and become a more valuable leader in the EM community. This workshop will be presented utilizing both a didactic format and group interactive activities. Additionally, a list of suggested readings and tools will be provided at the completion of this workshop.

Objectives: Upon completion of this roundtable learners will be able to:
  • Differentiate between leadership and management
  • Determine your leadership style and strengths; how that effects your professional interactions and the areas you may want to improve 
  • Explain the essential communication skills utilized by effective leaders and understand how to implement them
  • Apply the principles and practices of effective leadership
  • Describe your core values as a leader
  • Evaluate and execute time management strategies for improving your productivity
  • Implement strategies learned to more smoothly navigate the transition from a colleague to supervisor
  • Evaluated how to better utilize your leadership qualities and enhanced communication skills to more effectively foster your APP team’s success; Expand your repertoire of essential hiring and firing strategies
  • Execute tactics that create a culture of leadership and performance among your APP colleagues (build collaboration, teamwork, and trust to help others excel).
  • Identify various leadership roles available throughout EM, both paid and voluntary
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm  Workshop: EKG Workshop
George Higgins, III, MD, FACEP 
Diagnostic electrocardiography is an essential skill required of clinicians in many specialties.  Patients with chest pain, palpitations, syncope, shortness of breath, and mental status change regularly present unexpectedly for evaluation.  An EKG is routinely ordered in these situations, and major treatment decisions often are driven off the interpretation of this test.  This workshop will familiarize Acute Care clinicians with a number of EKG abnormalities that they are likely to encounter during their careers.   


Objectives:
The following conditions which provide ECG clues to the diagnosis will be reviewed:

  • Acute posterior myocardial infarction
  • Acute right ventricular infarction
  • Acute myocardial infarction in the presence of LBBB
  • Recognizing SVT with aberrancy and differentiating it from VT
  • Wolf –Parkinson-White and Lown-Ganong-Levine Syndromes
  • ECG changes associated with subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorhage
  • ECG changes associated with tricyclic antidepressant toxicity
  • Wellen’s Syndrome  
  • Brugada Syndrome
  • Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
  • ECG changes associated with heart transplantation
  • Dressler’s Syndrome
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Critical Procedures in Emergency Medicine: A Hands On Experience (Also available Thursday)
Steven Godwin, MD, FACEP
This course is designed to help practitioners meet a significant number of their procedural requirements listed for EM Certificate of Added Qualifications.  We will provide expert instruction on procedural skills including Ultrasound Guided Vascular Access, Lumbar Puncture with and without Ultrasound Guidance, Tube Thoracostomy/Needle Decompression, Intra-Osseus, Thoracentesis and Defibrillation with transcutaneous pacing. 


Objectives:  

  • Learners will be able to demonstrate fluid resuscitation in the presence of sepsis shock.
  • Learners will demonstrate ultrasound guided techniques in vascular access.
  • Learners will be able to demonstrate proper lumbar puncture technique with and without ultrasound guidance
  • Learners will be able to place thoracostomy tubes
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Diagnosis and Management of Common Orthopedic Injuries
Drew Maurano PA-C, James Marinucci, Amy Keim, PA-C MS, Ryan Strauss, PA-C, MPAS, MPH
This is a case-based workshop that will work through the diagnosis, management, pearls, and pitfalls of a variety of common adult orthopedic injuries.  Participants will learn key procedures in the management of common orthopedic injuries including:  interphalangeal joint reduction, metacarpal phalangeal digit block, metacarpal fracture reduction and splinting, hematoma block, distal radius reduction and splinting, ankle fractures and immobilization techniques, glenohumeral joint reduction, intra-articular anesthesia, knee aspiration, and measuring compartment pressures. 


Objectives:  
At the conclusion of this hands-on workshop, participants should be able to: 

  • Perform appropriate motor, neurological, and vascular examination for common orthopedic injuries
  • Recognize and categorize common joint dislocations and fractures on x-ray
  • Perform peripheral, intra-articular and hematoma anesthesia blocks for procedural pain management
  • Demonstrate a variety of methods of joint and fracture reduction
  • Identify indications for and methods of immobilization
  • Appropriately utilize a variety of immobilization materials including plaster, fiberglass and pre-formed splints
  • Perform knee arthrocentesis
  • Appropriately diagnose and manage common compartment syndromes
  • Describe complications of common orthopedic injuries
  • Make appropriate referrals to specialist consultants
   

Saturday, April 2, 2016

8:00 am - 8:30 am 49 Years on the Front Lines: Some Shared Wisdom
Joe Lex, MD, FACEP, MAAEM
Joe Lex has been involved in Emergency Medicine since 1967.  He will share many of the things he has learned in those 49 years: about clinical medicine, about education, and about life itself. 


Objectives:  

  •  Discuss several reasons why emergency medicine is different from other areas of medicine. 
  • List characteristics of an ideal emergency physician 
  • Explain why FOAMed (Free Open Access Medical Education) is developed primarily by and for emergency practitioners, and how fits into your present and future
8:30 am - 9:00 am New Paradigms in Stroke Care: What's Hot and What's Not
Evie Marcolini, MD, FACEP
In 2015 we witnessed a paradigm shift in the treatment of ischemic stroke, with the publication of the MR-CLEAN study which showed improved outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients who received mechanical thrombectomy.  Soon after, three more endovascular studies stopped recruitment early because the data also showed improved outcome.  We will look at the history of ischemic stroke treatment, the impact of the recent publications and how this affects the practice of emergency medicine.   


Objectives:  

  • Review the history of systemic tPA, arterial tPA and endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke
  • Understand the concept of tissue-based assessment
  • Review the endovascular trials
  • Review the pertinent AHA/ASA guidelines  
9:00 am - 9:30 am Top Eye Emergencies: Don't Be Blind to the Diagnosis
Jason Knight, MD, FACEP
The presenter will use interactive case studies to educate attendees on the top eye emergencies encountered in the ED with a particular focus on the history, clinical presentation, physical exam, test ordering, consultation, and disposition of eye patients. 


Objectives:  

  • Review the anatomy and physiology of ocular emergencies including conjunctivitis, keratitis, scleritis, episcleritis, uveitis, optic neuritis, amaurosis fugax, central retinal artery occlusion, acute-angle closure glaucoma, and retinal detachment
  • Describe the anatomy of the eye and the neurologic pathways that are important for vision
  • Recognize key components of eye patients histories
  • Incorporate the key elements of ophthalmology physical exam findings
  • Describe the workup of serious sight-threatening eye disorders
  • Eye surgery complications also will be discussed. 
  • Describe vision-saving ED procedures
  • The presenter will discuss how to call an "A+" ophthalmology consult 
9:30 am - 10:00 am Lytics in Acute Stroke: What's All the Fuss?
Joe Lex, MD, FACEP, MAAEM
Since the NINDS study in 1995, there has been controversy about the use of thrombolytic agents in the acute stroke patient.  The newest studies that show improved results using interventions early after stroke may make the use of tPA obsolete.  What was all the shouting about? 


Objectives:  

  • Explain what "science" is really all about.
  • Discuss why many emergency physicians felt that the case had never been made for the use of tPA in stroke.
  • Describe the concept of "citation bias" and how it applied to studies of fibrinolytic agents and stroke. 
  
10:30 am - 11:00 am Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pearls and Pitfalls
Evie Marcolini, MD, FACEP
Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a relatively uncommon etiology of headache, but patient outcome can be devastating, especially if the diagnosis is missed in the patient's first visit.  We will talk about how to find this needle in the haystack, and the most current recommendations for assessment and treatment of this important disease.   


Objectives:  

  • Review the assessment of the patient with headache
  • Understand the modalities of diagnosis for subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Review treatment goals for the patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage in the emergency department 
11:00 am - 11:30 am Shocking News: Electricity, Microwave, and TASER Injuries
Joe Lex, MD, FACEP, MAAEM
How does lightning kill?  Are TASERs really dangerous?  Who needs to be admitted after experiencing a shock from a household current?  You'' get the answers to these questions and more. 


Objectives:  

  • Discuss controversies about: microwave injuries, cord-biting injuries, lightning injuries, and TASER(r) injuries 
  • Explore some controversies in management of electrical injuries 
  • Determine who really requires hospital admission after electrical shock injury 4. Discuss how pregnancy changes management of electrical shock injury
11:30 am - 12:00 pm Thyroid and Adrenal Emergencies in the ED
Jason Knight, MD, FACEP 
The purpose of this lecture is to educated PAs on how to independently diagnose, evaluate, and treat thyroid and adrenal emergencies. 


Objectives:  

  • Describe the pathophysiology thyrotoxicosis.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of potential causes of thyroid storm.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the etiologic factors of thyrotoxicosis.
  • Describe typical physical examination findings in the patient who has hyperthyroidism, and thyrotoxicosis.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of laboratory studies useful in the clinical diagnosis of hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis.
  • Discuss the treatment for patients who present in thyroid storm.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.
  • Describe the causes of myxedema coma
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the typical clinical presentation of patients with hypothyroidism.
  • Describe the laboratory findings that frequently occur in patients with hypothyroidism
  • Describe the treatment of hypothyroidism.
  • Describe the clinical presentation of patients who present with adrenal insufficiency.
  • Describe the precipitating factors that may cause adrenocortical insufficiency.
  • Describe the laboratory findings that frequently occur with adrenocorticoid insufficiency.
  • Describe the treatment for the patient who has adrenocortical insufficiency.
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm Venomous Vipers: Approach and Treatment to US Envenomations
Christian Tomaszewski, MD, MS, MBA, FACEP, FACMT, FIFEM
Rattlesnakes and copperheads abound in the US, depending on what coast you live in.   Although rare, a serious envenomation can tax a clinician who is trying to decide what predicts a bad outcome. The speaker will cover the clinical manifestations of enveomation and appropriate use of antivenom. 


Objectives:  

  • List clinical manifestations of viper envenomation
  • Review initial treatment and stabilization of such bites
  • Discuss approach to use of antivenom, including indications and adverse effects. 
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine
Jason Knight, MD, FACEP
Visual diagnosis is a key component to being successful as a clinician in the emergency department.  This lecture will be a rapid fire visual diagnosis board review with an emphasis on clinical diagnosis and management. 


Objectives:  

  • Identify and incorporate visual emergency medicine findings into a patient's diagnosis and treatment plan
  • Review critical visual diagnosis radiology findings seen in advanced imaging studies and plain films
  • Learn the critical visual diagnosis clues to correctly identify emergent versus non-emergent dermatology conditions presenting to the emergency department.
  • Incorporate visual diagnosis stimuli into your comprehensive fund of knowledge in order to better treat emergency medical conditions. 
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm Rapture of the Deep: Diving Emergencies
Christian Tomaszewski, MD, MS, MBA, FACEP, FACMT, FIFEM
Although drowning may be the most common pathway to death while diving, many scuba divers can suffer morbidity related to using compressed gases.  How do you decide if that vague complaint of tingling in an arm after a dive is a benign radiculopathy or a mild manifestation of decompression sickness?  The speaker will review the clinical manifestations of decompression sickness and barotrauma, and the approach to treatment with oxygen, including indications for hyperbaric oxygen. 


Objectives:  

  • Distinguish barotrauma from decompression sickness (the bends).
  • Review mimics that could be mistaken for decompression illness.
  • Discuss treatment of decompression illness, including indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy.
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm Pitfalls in Traumatic Brain Injury Management
Evie Marcolini, MD, FACEP
The patient with severe traumatic brain injury doesn't have any time to spare, and neither do you.  there are a few very important guidelines to follow regarding the acute care of this patient that will improve outcome.  We will review the assessment, treatment and current guidelines for this devastating injury.    


Objectives:  

  • Review the assessment of the patient with traumatic brain injury
  • Understand the important therapeutic steps in the care for the patient with traumatic brain injury
  • Review the most current guidelines for traumatic brain injury  
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm The Crashing Asthmatic
Mel Herbert, MD, FACEP
Review the therapies and techniques to care for the crashing and dying asthmatic patient. 


Objectives:  

  • Learners will be able to list the therapies in Asthma
  • Describe technique of ventilation in asthma
  • Summarize an approach to asthmatic arrest
3:30 pm - 6:30 pm Workshop: Advanced Airway Management
Steven Godwin, MD, FACEP
This will be a hands-on airway skills workshop that will provide participants with the opportunity to enhance airway management skills regarding preparation for intubation, optimization of physiology, and skills specific to intubation with direct laryngoscopy, video laryngoscopy and fiberoptic scopes.  Participants will also be exposed to rescue techniques utilizing extra-glottic devices and learn cricothyrotomy. 


Objectives:  

  • Learners will be able to describe indications for intubation.
  • Learners will be able to describe mechanism to enhance oxygenation and prevent hypoxia
  • Participants will be able to describe primary methods for optimizing physiology for intubation
  • Learners will be able to practice direct laryngoscopy skills with adult and pediatric intubations
  • Participants will learn advanced techniques for endotracheal tube placement with the use of video laryngoscopes and fiberoptic scopes
  • Participants will have exposure to rescue devices for difficult and failed airways
3:30 pm - 5:30 pm Workshop: Toxicology Lab: "Scratch and Sniff"
Christian Tomaszewski, MD, MS, MBA, FACEP, FACMT, FIFEM
This interactive session will display 10 intriguing stations where attendees will need to solve cases based on clues.   These clues will include either odors, plants or drug paraphenalia that will help cement the cases to memory.   Be prepared to be challenging in guessing the toxins responsible and treatment for each case.  


Objectives:  

  • List smells characteristic of selected poisonings.
  • Recognize plants that could lead to clinical toxicity.
  • Learn basic toxidromes and their treatment.

Sunday, April 3, 2016

8:00 am - 8:30 am Why We Do Emergency Medicine?
Mel Herbert, MD, FACEP
An inspirational talk on the philosophical question of why we do emergency medicine. 


Objectives:  

  • Describe the history of Emergency Medicine
  • List three reasons the speciality is unique
  • List the unique skills required of Emergency Medicine
8:30 am - 9:00 am Nontraumatic Back Pain: Reasons why it should tighten your sphincter
Andrew Perron, MD, FACEP
Back pain is a common complaint in the ED.  During this session the speaker will review the evidence-based historical and physical exam-based findings that help identify pathology in the few who harbor it, while limiting the work-up in the vast majority in whom it is not indicated. 


Objectives:  

  • Understand the common red flags for pathology associated with back pain
  • Describe an efficient but complete neurological examination appropriate for the back pain patient
  • Identify some evidence-based back pain treatments.
9:00 am - 9:30 am DKA Management in the ED
Sanjay Arora, MD
Hyperglycemia is a common finding in the emergency department, but emergency providers must be able to quickly and accurately assess patients for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Although rare, DKA is an acute alteration in metabolic state which can be life threatening if not recognized and treated appropriately.  Screening for this condition can be confusing and time consuming if not done appropriately. And once the diagnosis is made, treatments have the potential to worsen the situation if not carried out in the correct order. One must also never forget to search for and treat the stressor that caused the DKA. The speaker will explain how to effectively screen for and diagnose DKA as well as provide a management algorithm.  


Objectives:  

  • Review the pathophysiology of DKA.
  • Discuss the optimal strategy (including criteria set forth by the American Diabetes Association) for making a rapid and accurate diagnosis of DKA.
  • Outline a treatment algorithm with an emphasis on fluid administration, insulin dosing and electrolyte repletion.
9:30 am - 10:00 am Simplified Approach to Arrythmias
Mel Herbert, MD, FACEP
Describe a very simplifed approach to tachyarrythmias. 


Objectives:  

  • List the 4 common arrtyhmia groups
  • Describe an approach to the crashing patient with a tachyarrythmia
  • Review the side effects of adenosine
10:15 am - 10:45 am Pediatric Orthopedics: Unique Injuries in Kids that You Must Know
 Emily Rose, MD, FAAP, FAAEM, FACEP
Children experience unique orthopedic injuries that are not seen in adults that you must be able to identify and manage. During this case-based lecture the speaker will review these injuries, discuss differential diagnoses and detail management. 


Objectives:  

  • Compare and contrast orthopedic injury patterns in children versus adults
  • Review unique pediatric lower extemity injuries, incuding supracondylar fractures and radial head subluxations
  • Review unique pediatric lower extremity injuries, including SCFE, spetic hip, toxic synovitis of the hip and Osgood-Schlatter disease
  • List factors that would make you consider the diagnosis of non-accidental trauma.
10:45 am - 11:15 am Oncologic Emergencies
Sanjay Arora, MD
Patients with a history of or new diagnosis of cancer have a unique set of potential complications that emergency providers must be aware of. These range from electrolyte disorders to hyper-viscosity syndromes to rare surgical emergencies.  Even treating a patient with a fever becomes much more nuanced if there is a possibility that the patient may be neutropenic. In this lecture, the speaker will use a case based approach to address some common myths related to patients with cancer, discuss both rare and common oncologic emergences, and describe when emergent consults are indicated.  


Objectives:  

  • Understand the management of the neutropenic cancer patient.
  • Discuss the diagnosis and treatment of rare and common emergent conditions associated with cancer presentation, disease progression and therapy.
  • Describe the management of cancer associated electrolyte abnormalities
11:15 am - 11:45 am Concussion Update: What do we know, what do we not know?
Andrew Perron, MD, FACEP
The evaluation and management of concussion is a current "hot topic" where the world of EM, sportsmedicine, neurology, and neurosurgery currently intersect.  This lecture will update the attendee on current thinking regarding concussion prevention, evaluation, management, and return to play. 


Objectives:  

  • Understand the pathophysiology of concussion
  • Identify interventions that are evidence-based that can help reduce concussion
  • Describe the connection between concussion and long-term neurcognitive dysfunction.
11:45 am - 12:15 pm Can't Miss Pediatric Rashes: A Visual Odyssey
Emily Rose, MD, FAAP, FAAEM, FACEP
Children may present with a variety of dermatologic findings. Some rashes are benign, while others are related to serious (even life-threatening) underlying medical conditions. This presentation will focus on the frequent and benign, as well as the infrequent and not-so-benign, rashes that may be encountered when caring for pediatric patients in the ED. 


Objectives:  

  • Develop an organized approach to the pediatric patient presenting with a rash
  • Identify common rashes related to viral illness
  • Identify not-so-common rashes related to serious bacterial infection
  • Identify rashes to other causes including scabies, allergic reactions and others
  • Discuss the key high risk presentations and documentation that is essential when caring for these patients
12:15 pm - 12:45 pm Orthopedic Neurologic Emergencies in the Emergency Department: From the Cervical Spine to the Sacrum, the Brachial Plexus and Beyond
Andrew Perron, MD, FACEP
The neurologic examination pertinent to the evaluation of orthopedic injuries (specifically spine and the extremities) is different than one that would be used for stroke.  The attendee will learn a fast, simple neurologic examination to employ when evaluating patients with these conditions. 


Objectives:  

  • Identify the common neurologic injuries associated with orthopedic injuries
  • Demonstrate the performance of a rapid, simple orthopedic neurology examination of the upper extremities.
  • Demonstrate the performance of a rapid, simple orthopedic neurology examination of the lower extremities.

 

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